Area Fish

American Shad

Description and Identifying Characteristics:
American Shad have metallic-silver flanks with a large light green back
and white belly.  A large black spot behind the top of the gill cover may be followed by a row of smaller spots.


Size:
Average size of the American Shad is 3 pounds, however some larger Shad can reach up to 6 pounds.


Habitat:
American Shad spend most of their lives in salt water returning to their birth rivers to spawn. 

Flies to use:
Freidrich Shad Fly,Cliffy Shad Fly,Woolly Buggers, Clousers, and Crazy Charlies are all common offerings for shad

 

Redfish

Description and Identifying Characteristics:
The most distinguishing mark on the red drum is one large black spot on the upper part of the tail base.
Having multiple spots is not uncommon for this fish but having no spots is extremely rare. The color of
red drum ranges from a deep blackish, coppery color to nearly silver. The most common color is reddish-bronze.

Size:
Redfish are a fast growing fish reaching approximately 11 inches and one pound in its first year, 17-22 inches and
3 1/2 pounds in two years, and 22-24 inches and 6-8 pounds in three years. The record red drum was 96 pounds
 and was caught on the East coast. The average size is 6 to 10 pounds.

Habitat:
Redfish prefer shallow waters (1-4 feet deep) along the edges of bays with submerged vegetation such as sea grasses. They are found over all bottom types but they seem to prefer areas with submerged vegetation and soft mud. These fish are also commonly found around oyster reefs. Breaks in continuity of shorelines such as coves, points, jetties, old pier pilings, and guts attract them. They prefer soft mud along jetties, pier pilings and jetties. They are often found in water so shallow that their backs are exposed while swimming. During cold spells large numbers of red drum can be found in tidal creeks and rivers. They can live in fresh water and have been found many miles upriver.

Flies to use:
Small surface popping plugs, baitfish type streamers or shrimp and crab imitation flies, Clouser Minnow, Wobbler or Lefty's Deceiver

Spotted Seatrout

Description and Identifying Characteristics:
Distinguishing characteristics include a dark gray or green back and silvery-white below, with distinct round
spots on back, fins and tail; black margin along the edge of tail; soft dorsal (back) fin with no scales;
and one or two prominent canine teeth usually present at the tip of the upper jaw.

Size:
Spotted seatrout males average 19 inches in length. Females are 25 inches long on average. Males and females weigh 2 to 3 pounds.

Habitat:
Spotted seatrout prefer shallower bays and estuaries with oyster beds and seagrass beds that attract prey species. They are most common in the shallow bays during spring and summer. As water temperatures decline during fall, fish move into deeper bay waters and the Gulf of Mexico. As water temperatures warm in the spring the fish move back into the shallows of the primary and secondary bays. During periods of low rainfall and runoff, many trout often move into deeper rivers and bayous with the first cool weather of fall. Similar concentrations occur at dredged boat harbors and channels.

Flies to use:
Rattlin' Minnow, Lefty's Deceiver, Clouser Minnow, Wobbler

Snook

Description and Identifying Characteristics:
Distinct lateral line; high, divided dorsal fin; sloping forehead; large mouth, protruding lower jaw, pelvic fin yellow.

Size:
Average size fish is approximately 5 to 8 pounds

Habitat
Snook are found within the tropics and subtropics. They prefer near shore habitats such as bays, rivers and inlets. The range of Snook is largely determined by water temperature. Adults concentrate in Gulf passes and around pilings or other underwater structures and sometimes run up rivers and into lakes. Periodic cold water temperatures decimate populations of this tropical species.

Flies to Use:
Clouser Minnow, Lefty's Deceiver, Seaducer

Home          Membership          About Us         Meetings          Healing Waters        Education      Mosquito Lagoon      News Letters
aaaaaaaaaaaaiii